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Monday, 31 July 2017 15:35

Video - Nitrogeno #3 presentation

Leonardo Anfolsi present third issue of Nitrogeno

HOW THEY MADE GOLD:

Alchemists were really able to produce gold. Here are their stories and those of modern scientific researchers who have obtained the same result: researches, evidences and (true) procedures to make gold.

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